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Apple Shares Trailer for Upcoming Apple TV+ Show 'Amazing Stories' Coming March 6

Apple this morning shared a trailer for upcoming Apple TV+ science fiction series “Amazing Stories,” which is a reimagining of the original 1980s series of the same name.

“Amazing Stories” was one of the first TV shows that Apple picked up for ‌Apple TV‌+, and each episode will focus on a new topic, much like “Black Mirror” and “Twilight Zone.” The original was created by Steven Spielberg, who serves as executive producer on the reboot.

Earlier this year, Apple said that each episode of the series will “transport the audience to worlds of wonder through the lens of today’s most imaginative filmmakers, directors and writers.”

Stars in “Amazing Stories” include Dylan O’Brien (“Maze Runner,” “Teen Wolf”), Victoria Pedretti (“You”), Josh Holloway (“Lost,” “Yellowstone”), Sasha Alexander (“Rizzoli & Isles,” “Shameless”) and Robert Forster (“Twin Peaks”).

“Amazing Stories” will launch on Friday, March 6, and there will be 10 episodes in the first season of the show.

This article, “Apple Shares Trailer for Upcoming Apple TV+ Show ‘Amazing Stories’ Coming March 6” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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iOS 13 Battery Drain: 15+ Tips to Make Your Battery Last Longer

With every new operating system update, there are complaints about battery life and rapid battery drain, and iOS 13 is no exception. Since iOS 13 was released, we’ve seen reports of issues with battery life, which have waxed and waned with various iOS …

Apple Designing 5G iPhone Antenna Module In-House After Being Dissatisfied With Qualcomm's Version

Apple is designing the antenna module that will be used in its 5G iPhones in-house because it was unhappy with the version that Qualcomm designed, reports Fast Company, citing a source with knowledge of Apple’s plans.

Apple reportedly “balked” at the design of the QTM 525 5G millimeter-wave antenna module offered by Qualcomm because it “doesn’t fit into the sleek industrial design Apple wants for the new phone.”


Qualcomm will still provide the 5G modem chip used in the new iPhones, but the antenna module will be developed by Apple.

Apple is, however, working on another design that uses both the Qualcomm modem and the Qualcomm antenna as a backup, so Apple does have the option to swap over to a version of the iPhone that uses both Qualcomm components, but if forced to do so, Apple will need to release a slightly thicker ‌iPhone‌.

As Fast Company points out, Apple has run into problems with antennas designed in-house before. The ‌iPhone‌ 4, for example, had an antenna design that resulted in dropped calls and other problems when the ‌iPhone‌ was held in a way that covered the antennas. Fast Company‘s source says that another recent Apple antenna design “required twice as much power as comparable antennas to produce the same amount of radio signal.”

Creating 5G antennas for mmWave networks is harder than creating other kinds of antennas because they send and receive higher frequency signals, leaving less room for error. 5G performance is also reliant on the antenna design.

The 2020 iPhones equipped with 5G will use a “phased array” antenna with two parts that work together to form a beam of radio signal, as described by Fast Company, which could lead to issues if the antenna and modem module are made by different companies.

The beam can be electronically steered in different directions without the antenna moving. The modem chip and the antenna module work closely together to make this work properly, our source said. Having the two parts made by different companies may introduce some uncertainty and bump up the difficulty level of the overall design.

Apple reportedly wants to use its own antennas both because of design reasons and because Apple wants as few Qualcomm parts in the ‌iPhone‌ as possible. Fast Company‘s source suggests that Apple continues to feel it is “getting screwed on royalties” by Qualcomm.

Rumors have suggested that Apple is working on developing its own modem chips for use in future iPhones, but that technology is not ready yet, and until it is, Apple is reliant on Qualcomm’s 5G modem chips. Apple purchased Intel’s modem chip business after Intel exited the mobile modem chip development market, which could speed up Apple’s work on developing its own chip technology.


Apple is expected to release multiple 5G capable iPhones in 2020 that are equipped with Qualcomm’s X55 5G modem chip that offers 7Gb/s peak download speeds and 3Gb/s upload speeds. For more on what to expect in the 2020 iPhones, make sure to check out our roundup.

This article, “Apple Designing 5G iPhone Antenna Module In-House After Being Dissatisfied With Qualcomm’s Version” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple 'Suffocates the Creation of New Technologies,' Claims Former Chip Designer Being Sued for Breach of Contract

Apple has been in an ongoing legal fight with Gerard Williams III, who worked at Apple until February 2019 when he left to start up a new company called Nuvia with other Apple developers.

Williams was Apple’s lead chip designer, working on the A7 to A12X chips that Apple used in its mobile devices, and his new company develops processors for use in data centers. Apple first sued Williams in August 2019, claiming that his contracts with Apple prevented him from engaging in business activities that are directly related to Apple’s business.


Since then, Williams has claimed that Apple invaded his privacy and monitored his texts, while Apple complained that Williams had been planning and developing Nuvia while still at Apple, and also soliciting Apple employees.

In January, Williams tried to get the lawsuit brought against him by Apple rejected by the court, but he was unsuccessful, and now he’s back with a new claim that Apple has been recruiting engineers from Nuvia.

According to Bloomberg, Williams says that Apple is aiming to lure his staff away and is also preventing its own employees from leaving to pursue their own ventures. He claims that Apple’s lawsuit against him for breach of contract aims to “suffocate the creation of new technologies and solutions by a new business, and to diminish the freedom of entrepreneurs to seek out more fulfilling work.”

He goes on to accuse Apple of improperly deterring employees “from making even preliminary and legally protected preparations to form a new business – whether competitive or otherwise.”

There has been no final word on whether the case will progress to trial yet, though a judge has already dismissed Apple’s bid for punitive damages against Williams as Apple failed to show how Williams intentionally tried to harm the company by being disloyal.

Tag: lawsuit

This article, “Apple ‘Suffocates the Creation of New Technologies,’ Claims Former Chip Designer Being Sued for Breach of Contract” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Samsung's New Galaxy Buds+ Compared to AirPods and AirPods Pro

Samsung at its Unpacked Event in San Francisco this week unveiled the new Galaxy Z Flip and the S20 smartphone lineup, and accompanying its new flagship devices, Samsung also launched its next-generation wire-free earbuds, the Galaxy Buds+.

In our latest YouTube video, we took a look at the new Galaxy Buds+ to test them out, and we did a quick comparison with the AirPods and the AirPods Pro.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Design wise, the Galaxy Buds+ look pretty much identical to the original Galaxy Buds, but there’s an extra microphone that’s been added and the charging case now has a glossy finish instead of a matte finish. The size, fit, and comfort are unchanged.

The Galaxy Buds+ are closer in design to the ‌AirPods Pro‌ than the ‌AirPods‌ because of the soft silicone tips that fit into the ear canal to provide a tighter seal, but there is no noise canceling technology included in the Galaxy Buds+.


With the second-generation version of the Galaxy Buds, Samsung aimed to improve audio quality for music and phone calls along with battery life, both of which do seem to be better. The Galaxy Buds+ now last for 11 hours before needing to be recharged with the case, and the sound seems to be improved.

Though closer in design to the ‌AirPods Pro‌, the price point and the functionality of the Galaxy Buds+ better matches the standard ‌AirPods‌. The Galaxy Buds+ are $149, so $10 cheaper than the standard ‌AirPods‌ without charging case and $100 cheaper than the ‌AirPods Pro‌.


There are touch controls on each Galaxy Bud+ earbud, which can be used to play/pause, skip tracks, and activate voice assistants. Those are the only three functions available when connecting the Galaxy Buds+ to the iPhone, but with an Android device, the long press function can be customized to auto-launch Spotify.

Samsung also offers tools for controlling ambient sound levels (though we didn’t notice much of a difference with this enabled), and adjusting the sound profile. There are a few preset options for increasing bass or treble and there’s an option for making audio more dynamic or soft. There’s no true equalizer function, but it’s better than what’s available for ‌AirPods‌, which is nothing.

Galaxy Buds+ on Android can read notifications to you, a function not available when using them with the ‌iPhone‌. ‌AirPods‌ offer a similar function in iOS 13, allowing Siri to announce incoming messages.


Galaxy Buds+ can also be connected to multiple devices at the same time such as a TV and an Android phone so you can hear incoming notifications, but this is not a feature that works when using them with an ‌iPhone‌.

Overall, the Galaxy Buds+ audio seems to be improved and they sound better than the ‌AirPods‌, but there’s not a huge difference. There is a major difference in sound quality compared to the ‌AirPods Pro‌ in favor of the ‌AirPods Pro‌, but that’s probably not a fair comparison given the Galaxy Buds+ are $100 cheaper and not meant to compete with Apple’s noise canceling headphones.

Android users who have considered getting ‌AirPods‌ for their smartphones might want to consider the Galaxy Buds+ instead, but those who use both iOS and Android may still want to go for the regular ‌AirPods‌ because of the H1 chip functionality.

What do you think of Samsung’s improved Galaxy Buds+? Let us know in the comments.

Tag: Samsung

This article, “Samsung’s New Galaxy Buds+ Compared to AirPods and AirPods Pro” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s HomePod Places Sixth in Global Smart Speaker Market in Q4 2019

Apple shipped an estimated 2.6 million HomePods during the fourth quarter of 2019, earning it 4.7 percent of the smart speaker market, according to new estimates shared today by Strategy Analytics.

Apple was the number six worldwide smart speaker ma…

Apple’s HomePod Places Sixth in Global Smart Speaker Market in Q4 2019

Apple shipped an estimated 2.6 million HomePods during the fourth quarter of 2019, earning it 4.7 percent of the smart speaker market, according to new estimates shared today by Strategy Analytics.

Apple was the number six worldwide smart speaker ma…

YouTube TV Ending Support for App Store Subscriptions in March

YouTube today sent out emails to customers who are subscribed to its YouTube TV service through Apple’s App Store, letting them know that ‌App Store‌ subscriptions are going to be discontinued in March.

From the emails:You’re currently s…

YouTube TV Ending Support for App Store Subscriptions in March

YouTube today sent out emails to customers who are subscribed to its YouTube TV service through Apple’s App Store, letting them know that ‌App Store‌ subscriptions are going to be discontinued in March.

From the emails:You’re currently s…

YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It's a 'No Go' for Professional Colorists

Apple charges $5,000 for its Pro Display XDR and has described it as a display designed for professionals, even claiming that it can match the performance of some professional reference monitors on the market that sell for much more.

Vincent Teoh, a TV reviewer at HDTVTest, recently tested Apple’s Pro Display XDR claims, comparing it to Sony’s BVM-HX310 reference monitor, which uses dual-layer LCD technology and costs over $40,000.

Prior to pitting the Pro Display XDR against the Sony HX310, Teoh does in-depth testing of Apple’s display, measuring brightness, contrast, and color accuracy, with the testing demonstrating some of the faults in the Pro Display XDR.

There were problems with contrast and color accuracy at peak brightness along with “so-so” screen uniformity, leading Teoh to call the reference mode of the Pro Display XDR suitable for content consumption rather than content creation.

Teoh then compared the Pro Display XDR to the Sony BVM-HX310 reference display as the Sony display is the one that was mentioned when the Pro Display XDR was unveiled. The Pro Display XDR struggled to keep up with the Sony display, and Teoh said that it is not a viable cheaper reference monitor for professionals.

It appears that Apple’s marketing team may have been a bit overzealous in calling the Pro Display XDR the ‘World’s best pro display.’ […]

Compared side by side with the Sony HX310, the Pro Display XDR exhibits a number of shortcomings, particularly in dark scenes such as localized luminous fluctuations, blooming artifacts, as well as noticeably grayer blacks.

For a monitor to be used as a reference for commercial color grading, there can be no doubt whatsover about the picture on screen.

Let’s say J.J. Abrams is looking over your shoulders and wants a bit more lens flare in a particular scene. Can you be 100% sure that the VFX you’re adding in post will be reproduced accurately when watched on other displays? With the Pro Display XDR, there’s no way you can tell.

“I think the Pro Display XDR is a no go for any serious professional colorist,” he concluded. “At the end of the day, the Pro Display XDR is just an IPS display with 576 full array local dimming zones that happens to carry Apple’s logo and costs $5,000.”

He questions whether it’s fair to judge a $5,000 monitor against a $43,000 reference display, but points out that it was Apple that made that comparison first at WWDC. “The Pro Display XDR doesn’t deliver anywhere close to the consistency and accuracy demanded of reference monitors.”

Teoh’s full video on the Pro Display XDR is well worth watching for those who want to see the full testing details prior to making a purchase.

(H/T Matthew Panzarino and The Loop)

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It’s a ‘No Go’ for Professional Colorists” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It's a 'No Go' for Professional Colorists

Apple charges $5,000 for its Pro Display XDR and has described it as a display designed for professionals, even claiming that it can match the performance of some professional reference monitors on the market that sell for much more.

Vincent Teoh, a TV reviewer at HDTVTest, recently tested Apple’s Pro Display XDR claims, comparing it to Sony’s BVM-HX310 reference monitor, which uses dual-layer LCD technology and costs over $40,000.

Prior to pitting the Pro Display XDR against the Sony HX310, Teoh does in-depth testing of Apple’s display, measuring brightness, contrast, and color accuracy, with the testing demonstrating some of the faults in the Pro Display XDR.

There were problems with contrast and color accuracy at peak brightness along with “so-so” screen uniformity, leading Teoh to call the reference mode of the Pro Display XDR suitable for content consumption rather than content creation.

Teoh then compared the Pro Display XDR to the Sony BVM-HX310 reference display as the Sony display is the one that was mentioned when the Pro Display XDR was unveiled. The Pro Display XDR struggled to keep up with the Sony display, and Teoh said that it is not a viable cheaper reference monitor for professionals.

It appears that Apple’s marketing team may have been a bit overzealous in calling the Pro Display XDR the ‘World’s best pro display.’ […]

Compared side by side with the Sony HX310, the Pro Display XDR exhibits a number of shortcomings, particularly in dark scenes such as localized luminous fluctuations, blooming artifacts, as well as noticeably grayer blacks.

For a monitor to be used as a reference for commercial color grading, there can be no doubt whatsover about the picture on screen.

Let’s say J.J. Abrams is looking over your shoulders and wants a bit more lens flare in a particular scene. Can you be 100% sure that the VFX you’re adding in post will be reproduced accurately when watched on other displays? With the Pro Display XDR, there’s no way you can tell.

“I think the Pro Display XDR is a no go for any serious professional colorist,” he concluded. “At the end of the day, the Pro Display XDR is just an IPS display with 576 full array local dimming zones that happens to carry Apple’s logo and costs $5,000.”

He questions whether it’s fair to judge a $5,000 monitor against a $43,000 reference display, but points out that it was Apple that made that comparison first at WWDC. “The Pro Display XDR doesn’t deliver anywhere close to the consistency and accuracy demanded of reference monitors.”

Teoh’s full video on the Pro Display XDR is well worth watching for those who want to see the full testing details prior to making a purchase.

(H/T Matthew Panzarino and The Loop)

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It’s a ‘No Go’ for Professional Colorists” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Enhances Augmented Reality Quick Look Feature in Safari With Links to Make Shopping Online Easier

Apple is enhancing its Augmented Reality Quick Look feature that’s designed to allow users to see augmented reality versions of products they’re intending to purchase right in their houses.

According to CNET and TechCrunch, Apple has updated the Qui…

Apple Enhances Augmented Reality Quick Look Feature in Safari With Links to Make Shopping Online Easier

Apple is enhancing its Augmented Reality Quick Look feature that’s designed to allow users to see augmented reality versions of products they’re intending to purchase right in their houses.

According to CNET and TechCrunch, Apple has updated the Qui…

Apple Adds Search to Shazam App, Makes Forgotten Shazam Encore App Free to Download

Apple today updated song identification app Shazam with a new feature that allows users to search for content.

The refreshed version of the app features a new Search button right on the Home screen that can be used to look up any artist, song, or so…

Apple Adds Search to Shazam App, Makes Forgotten Shazam Encore App Free to Download

Apple today updated song identification app Shazam with a new feature that allows users to search for content.

The refreshed version of the app features a new Search button right on the Home screen that can be used to look up any artist, song, or so…

Mobile World Congress 2020 Canceled Due to Coronavirus

Mobile World Congress, a major smartphone trade show event held each year in Barcelona, Spain, has been canceled in 2020 due to the coronavirus outbreak.

The Mobile World Congress event in Spain is a huge trade show that’s important to the tech worl…

Andy Rubin's Essential Shutting Down, Newton Mail Service Ending Too

Back in 2015, Andy Rubin, the co-founder of the Android operating system, started up a company called Essential, focusing on smartphones. Essential launched its Essential Phone PH-1 in 2017, debuting a 5.71-inch device made from titanium and ceramic with an edge-to-edge QHD display.

The Essential Phone was praised for its design, but reviews found faults with the camera, the display, and other features, and it was never popular enough to compete with flagship smartphones from other companies.

The Essential Phone

Essential in October 2019 announced the Gem, a replacement for the Essential Phone, but the Gem is never going to see a release because Essential today announced that it is shutting down.

Our vision was to invent a mobile computing paradigm that more seamlessly integrated with people’s lifestyle needs. Despite our best efforts, we’ve now taken Gem as far as we can and regrettably have no clear path to deliver it to customers. Given this, we have made the difficult decision to cease operations and shutdown Essential.

Essential last year acquired the CloudMagic team and its cross-platform Newton Mail app, which is also affected by the shuttering of the company.

Essential will no longer be providing updates for the Essential Phone, and while it will continue to work, there will be no future software refreshes or customer support available. Newton Mail will be available through April 30, 2020.

The unreleased Essential Gem

Essential says that it offers its “deepest thanks” to the Essential and Newton Mail communities for their “support and passion for our vision.”

When it launched, Essential secured over $330 million in funding and at one point, the company had a $1 billion valuation. Essential was impacted by poor sales of its phone and its inability to put out another product.

This article, “Andy Rubin’s Essential Shutting Down, Newton Mail Service Ending Too” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With Samsung's New S20 and Galaxy Z Flip Smartphones

Samsung today announced a new slate of 2020 smartphones, debuting a range of devices that include the S20 5G, the S20+ 5G, the S20 Ultra 5G, and the most novel, the foldable Galaxy Z Flip.

MacRumors videographer Dan was in attendance at Samsung’s Unpacked event in San Francisco, and he was able to spend some hands-on time with the new smartphones. Watch the video below for some close-up details and opinions on Samsung’s new lineup, which competes both with Apple’s current lineup and its upcoming 2020 smartphones, which we expect to see in September.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Samsung’s Galaxy Z Flip is its second foldable device, but the first that’s designed with a smartphone form factor. The device starts out as a 6.7-inch smartphone, but folds in half to make it more pocketable.


The Z Flip is Samsung’s first foldable smartphone that uses a glass display, with Samsung adopting new ultra thin foldable glass technology. Using glass rather than a laminate material results in a nicer display and a device that overall, feels more premium.


The hinge feels sturdier than the hinge in the Galaxy Fold, and it’s a neat design because it can be set to multiple different angles and used in what’s called “Flex Mode” while half folded. In this mode, the bottom half props up the top half for a hands-free mode that can be used for selfies and unique photography opportunities.


Because of the hinge design and the way that it’s meant to be used at multiple angles, the Z Flip doesn’t open as easily as traditional flip phones, which is a net positive. It has a solid build and doesn’t feel as fragile as the Galaxy Fold.


Samsung is charging a whopping $1,380 for the Galaxy Z Flip, which is sensationally expensive for what’s essentially a gimmick, but it is a high-quality, solid design that demonstrates what’s possible with foldable display technology.


Samsung also showed off its new Galaxy S20, S20+, and S20 Ultra flagship devices, all of which feature 5G connectivity, huge batteries, giant bezel-free displays, and impressive camera technology.

Samsung’s smartphones range in size from 6.2 to 6.9 inches, and on the higher end, 6.9-inches is massive, especially for a device that has a bezel-free design with just a single pinhole camera cutout at the top. All of the phones offer HDR10+ support along with 120Hz refresh rates, but using the 120Hz refresh rate requires bumping the resolution down to 1080p.


There are some unique camera features, especially in the high-end Samsung S20 Ultra. It features a 12-megapixel ultra wide-angle camera, a 108-megapixel wide-angle camera, a 48-megapixel telephoto camera, and a Depth Vision Camera.

The cameras are designed to take improved images in low lighting conditions, and Samsung showed off an impressive 10x lossless zoom feature that offers a total of 100x zoom on the S20 Ultra.


When it comes to batteries, these smartphones have 4,000 to 5,000mAh capacities, which beats out anything the iPhone has to offer at the current time. Samsung’s devices are definitely premium and are bringing Samsung’s best tech to lure smartphone users away from the ‌iPhone‌, but they also have premium prices.

The Galaxy S20 has a price tag of $1,000, the S20+ is priced at $1,200, and the Galaxy S20 Ultra is priced at $1,400 and is a bit more expensive than the Galaxy Z Flip.

We’re going to have more in-depth coverage of the Galaxy Z Flip and Samsung’s new S20 smartphones coming in the near future, so expect to see some detailed comparisons with Apple’s smartphones starting later this week.

This article, “Hands-On With Samsung’s New S20 and Galaxy Z Flip Smartphones” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With Samsung's New S20 and Galaxy Z Flip Smartphones

Samsung today announced a new slate of 2020 smartphones, debuting a range of devices that include the S20 5G, the S20+ 5G, the S20 Ultra 5G, and the most novel, the foldable Galaxy Z Flip.

MacRumors videographer Dan was in attendance at Samsung’s Unpacked event in San Francisco, and he was able to spend some hands-on time with the new smartphones. Watch the video below for some close-up details and opinions on Samsung’s new lineup, which competes both with Apple’s current lineup and its upcoming 2020 smartphones, which we expect to see in September.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Samsung’s Galaxy Z Flip is its second foldable device, but the first that’s designed with a smartphone form factor. The device starts out as a 6.7-inch smartphone, but folds in half to make it more pocketable.


The Z Flip is Samsung’s first foldable smartphone that uses a glass display, with Samsung adopting new ultra thin foldable glass technology. Using glass rather than a laminate material results in a nicer display and a device that overall, feels more premium.


The hinge feels sturdier than the hinge in the Galaxy Fold, and it’s a neat design because it can be set to multiple different angles and used in what’s called “Flex Mode” while half folded. In this mode, the bottom half props up the top half for a hands-free mode that can be used for selfies and unique photography opportunities.


Because of the hinge design and the way that it’s meant to be used at multiple angles, the Z Flip doesn’t open as easily as traditional flip phones, which is a net positive. It has a solid build and doesn’t feel as fragile as the Galaxy Fold.


Samsung is charging a whopping $1,380 for the Galaxy Z Flip, which is sensationally expensive for what’s essentially a gimmick, but it is a high-quality, solid design that demonstrates what’s possible with foldable display technology.


Samsung also showed off its new Galaxy S20, S20+, and S20 Ultra flagship devices, all of which feature 5G connectivity, huge batteries, giant bezel-free displays, and impressive camera technology.

Samsung’s smartphones range in size from 6.2 to 6.9 inches, and on the higher end, 6.9-inches is massive, especially for a device that has a bezel-free design with just a single pinhole camera cutout at the top. All of the phones offer HDR10+ support along with 120Hz refresh rates, but using the 120Hz refresh rate requires bumping the resolution down to 1080p.


There are some unique camera features, especially in the high-end Samsung S20 Ultra. It features a 12-megapixel ultra wide-angle camera, a 108-megapixel wide-angle camera, a 48-megapixel telephoto camera, and a Depth Vision Camera.

The cameras are designed to take improved images in low lighting conditions, and Samsung showed off an impressive 10x lossless zoom feature that offers a total of 100x zoom on the S20 Ultra.


When it comes to batteries, these smartphones have 4,000 to 5,000mAh capacities, which beats out anything the iPhone has to offer at the current time. Samsung’s devices are definitely premium and are bringing Samsung’s best tech to lure smartphone users away from the ‌iPhone‌, but they also have premium prices.

The Galaxy S20 has a price tag of $1,000, the S20+ is priced at $1,200, and the Galaxy S20 Ultra is priced at $1,400 and is a bit more expensive than the Galaxy Z Flip.

We’re going to have more in-depth coverage of the Galaxy Z Flip and Samsung’s new S20 smartphones coming in the near future, so expect to see some detailed comparisons with Apple’s smartphones starting later this week.

This article, “Hands-On With Samsung’s New S20 and Galaxy Z Flip Smartphones” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Siri Now Able to Answer U.S. Election Questions

Siri, the built-in voice assistant on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Mac, HomePod, and other devices, is now able to answer questions related to the 2020 U.S. election and deliver live results as votes are counted, reports TechCrunch.

‌Siri‌ is a…

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