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Contact Info for Millions of Instagram Influencers, Celebrities, and Brand Accounts Leaked Online

A database that contained contact information for millions of Instagram influencers, celebrities, and brand accounts was recently leaked online, reports TechCrunch.

The database, which was hosted by Amazon Web Services and contains more than 49 mill…

U.S. Justice Department 'Leaning Against' Approving T-Mobile/Sprint Merger

The United States Justice Department is “leaning against” approving the merger between T-Mobile and Sprint, reports Bloomberg.

The merger might not be approved because the two companies “don’t go far enough” to resolve antitrust concerns raised by the U.S. government.


Bloomberg‘s report comes shortly after United States Federal Communications Chairman Ajit Pai said that he would recommend approval of the merger between Sprint and T-Mobile.

T-Mobile and Sprint have implemented changes to their merger to allay concerns, including the sale of Boost Mobile, a three-year buildout of a 5G network, and a pledge not to raise prices while the network is being built, but these steps may not be enough to earn approval.

Back in April, there were reports suggesting the DoJ had told Sprint and T-Mobile that the merger would not be approved as it was originally structured, which prompted the plans to sell Boost Mobile.

Sprint and T-Mobile first announced a merger agreement in April 2018, but the completion of the merger requires the government to approve the deal. A merger between Sprint and T-Mobile would combine two of the four major carriers in the U.S., and it would use the T-Mobile name.

The two companies would have close to 100 million customers, putting it second only to Verizon. The U.S. DoJ is concerned the deal would be a major threat to competition.

Sprint and T-Mobile planned to have the merger completed no later than the first half of 2019, but that date was pushed back to late July earlier this year.

This article, “U.S. Justice Department ‘Leaning Against’ Approving T-Mobile/Sprint Merger” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Google Launches New $999 Glass AR Headset for Enterprise Customers

Google today announced the launch of a new enterprise-focused Google Glass headset, the Glass Enterprise Edition 2.

The Glass Enterprise Edition 2 looks more like a traditional pair of glasses than a futuristic headset thanks to safety frames design…

Apple Seeding Second Beta of iOS 12.4 to Developers Today

Apple will today seed the second beta of an upcoming iOS 12.4 update to developers, almost one week after seeding the first iOS 12.4 beta, and two weeks after releasing iOS 12.3, a major update that introduced a revamped TV app.

Registered developer…

iOS 13: Everything We Know So Far

iOS 13 is expected to be announced at WWDC in just a few weeks. The leaks so far have suggested a number of new features: dark mode, iPad tweaks, new gestures, speed improvements, Live Photo improvements and a whole lot more. Read our full roundup for…

Powerbeats Pro Water Resistance Test: Find Out What Happens if You Drop Apple's Newest Earbuds in the Toilet

Apple’s new Powerbeats Pro earbuds feature a “reinforced design” for improved “sweat and water resistance” along with an official IPX4 water resistance rating, which means they should be able to hold up to a good amount of moisture.

Still, there were a lot of reports of the Powerbeats 3 failing due to sweat exposure, so we thought we’d test the liquid tolerance of the Powerbeats Pro with a series of water resistance tests.

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An IPX4 water resistance rating means that the Powerbeats Pro were able to withstand splashing water for at least 10 minutes, which is pretty decent because most people don’t sweat buckets of water for an extended period of time.


We tested splashing water, jets of water, and even an extended dunk in water, and the Powerbeats Pro held up and worked well after every single test. Here’s what we did:

Test 1 – Simulated a drop in a kitchen sink with heavy splashes of water.

Test 2 – Set the Powerbeats Pro in the shower for several minutes to simulate heavy rain.

Test 3 – Dropped the Powerbeats Pro in the toilet, submerging them briefly.

Test 4 – Dunked the Powerbeats Pro in a bowl of water for one minute.

Test 5 – Dunked the PowerBeats Pro in a bowl of water for five minutes.

Test 6 – Dunked the Powerbeats Pro in a bowl of water for 20 minutes.

After each water test, the sound coming from the Powerbeats Pro was muffled when we tested them, but once we got the water out, the earbuds were back to sounding normal.


The Powerbeats Pro survived all of our water tests. Nothing changed with the sound profile, the buttons continued to work, and charging was also fine. This suggests that the Powerbeats Pro do indeed have superior water resistance to the Powerbeats 3 and should hold up well to sweat.


We do not recommend showering with the Powerbeats Pro, using them in the rain, swimming with them, or otherwise exposing them to excessive moisture. Even when things are decently water resistant, the water resistance can wear down over time so it’s going to be best to keep the Powerbeats Pro as dry as possible.


While the Powerbeats Pro did well in our tests, we’ve only continually exposed them to water and moisture for a couple of hours. We still don’t know how they’ll hold up to sweat over time, but right now, things are looking positive.

This article, “Powerbeats Pro Water Resistance Test: Find Out What Happens if You Drop Apple’s Newest Earbuds in the Toilet” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Some 2018 Lexus Vehicles Eligible for $199 Software Update to Add CarPlay Support

Lexus recently announced that it is bringing CarPlay to some older vehicles, following the launch of CarPlay in new 2019 Lexus vehicles last September.

CarPlay can be installed in the 2018 LS, LC, RC, RC F, and NX, and as pointed out by iPhone in Ca…

Apple's U.S. iPhone User Base Sees Slowing Growth in Q1 2019

Apple’s estimated U.S. iPhone installed base saw little growth in the first calendar quarter of (second fiscal quarter) of 2019, according to new data shared today by Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP).

As of March 30, 2019, the U.S. iPhone use base hit 193 million units, compared to 189 million units at the end of the December quarter, marking two percent growth quarter over quarter.


Apple’s iPhone user base was at 173 million units at the end of the March 2018 quarter, for year over year growth of 12 percent, which is not bad, but not quite hitting the growth rates of prior years.

A year ago, the installed iPhone user base in the U.S. grew four percent quarter over quarter and 19 percent compared to the prior year, indicating a plateau iPhone user base.

“The US installed base of iPhones continues to plateau,” said Josh Lowitz, CIRP Partner and Co-Founder. “Relative to the most recent quarters, and especially to the past two or three years, slowing unit sales and longer ownership periods means that the growth in the number of US iPhones has flattened considerably. Of course, 12% growth in a year, after years of much greater growth is still good. However, investors grew accustomed to quarterly growth of 5% or more, and annual growth of almost 20%. This continuing trend prompts investors to wonder if iPhone sales outside of the US will compensate, and places greater pressure on Apple’s determination to sell other products and services to the installed base of iPhone owners.”

CIRP’s estimated U.S. iPhone installed base is based on estimated worldwide iPhone sales of 39 million, calculated from Apple’s iPhone revenue and average iPhone selling price for the quarter ending in March 2019.

iPhone sales have slowed down, and in January, the decline in sales over the holiday period led Apple to make the rare move of lowering its expected revenue guidance. Apple also saw a dip in revenue in the second fiscal quarter (first calendar quarter) of 2019, bringing in $58 billion, compared to $61.1 billion in the year-ago quarter.

Apple has never provided a specific breakdown of the number of active devices in the United States, but earlier this year, the company said there were 1.4 billion active devices around the world. 900 million of those devices are iPhones.

Tag: CIRP

This article, “Apple’s U.S. iPhone User Base Sees Slowing Growth in Q1 2019” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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How AirPlay 2 and the Apple TV App Work on a Samsung TV

When iOS 12.3 and tvOS 12.3 launched earlier this week with the updated TV app that Apple first teased at its March event, Samsung also rolled out support for both AirPlay 2 and the new TV app, making it the first third-party company to launch these fe…

Valve's 'Steam Link' App Now Available on iOS

Valve’s Steam Link app, which is designed to let you play Steam games on your iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV has finally made its way to iOS and is available for download as of today.

Valve first announced the Steam Link app in May 2018 and planned to launch it soon after, but Apple ended up rejecting the app due to “business conflicts.”


Though Valve argued that Steam Link was similar to other remote desktop-based apps that provide access to a PC or Mac, Apple refused to budge and did not allow Valve to release Steam Link until now.


Apple’s marketing chief Phil Schiller said in 2018 that Apple would continue to work with Valve to “bring the Steam experience to iOS and Apple TV in a way that complies with the [App Store] guidelines,” and it appears the two companies were finally able to reach an agreement.


Valve said that it would remove the ability to purchase apps from within Steam Link in an effort to get Apple to approve the app, which may have allowed it onto the App Store. When connecting Steam Link to a PC or Mac, the main view is of your library, aka the games you’ve already purchased, and there is no readily apparent option for purchasing content directly on your iOS device.

The new Steam Link app for iOS lets you play your Steam games on an iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV by streaming them from a Mac or PC. The Steam Link app essentially mirrors the content on your Mac or PC to your device. iOS 10 or later is required, and Valve recommends using 5GHz internet connections for the best performance. Games can be played using a Made for iPhone or Steam controller, and there are also touch screen control options that put virtual buttons on the screen.

Steam Link for iOS and tvOS – so glad Apple customers will now get to try it out! https://t.co/RZKpn5Sr7U

— Nat Brown (@natbro) May 15, 2019

Pairing an iOS device to a Mac or PC running Steam is a simple process. Your iPhone or iPad scans your network for a Mac or PC that has Steam installed, and pairing is done through a code. A bandwidth test is conducted to make sure there will be a smooth gameplay experience, and then additional drivers may need to be downloaded on your computer.

The Steam Link app brings desktop gaming to your iPhone or iPad. Just pair an MFI or Steam controller to your device, connect to a computer running Steam on the same local network, and start playing your existing Steam games.

Requirements:

– iPhone or iPad using iOS 10 or higher

– Computer running Steam – Windows, Mac, or Linux

– iOS device must be on the same local network as the computer running Steam

For best performance:

– Connect your computer using Ethernet to your 5Ghz WiFi router

– Connect your iOS device to the 5GHz band of your WiFi network

– Keep your iOS device within a reasonable range of your router

Steam Link can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Tag: Valve

This article, “Valve’s ‘Steam Link’ App Now Available on iOS” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Seeding First Beta of iOS 12.4 to Developers Today

Apple will today seed the first beta of an upcoming iOS 12.4 beta to developers, a few days after the launch of iOS 12.3, a major update that introduced Apple’s revamped TV app.

Registered developers can download the new iOS 12.4 beta from Apple’s D…

Hands-On With the OnePlus 7 Pro's New Pop-Up Camera and Bezel-Free Display

OnePlus today unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, the OnePlus 7 Pro, which offers an impressive feature set at a price that beats out flagship devices from other smartphone manufacturers, including Apple.

We were able to go hands-on with the OnePlus 7 Pro at the OnePlus event this morning, so we thought we’d give MacRumors readers a look at the bezel-free display and pop-up camera, both of which are great smartphone features.

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The OnePlus 7 Pro is all display, with a 6.67-inch OLED screen that takes up the entire front of the device. There are no camera cutouts or notches on the display at all, and that’s because OnePlus is using a nifty little front-facing camera that pops out of the back of the phone when you want to use it.


It’s a feature that’s unique to the OnePlus device, and it allows for an edge-to-edge top-to-bottom bezel-free display without sacrificing the selfie camera. The little pop out camera seems rather durable, though we’ll have to see how it holds up over time.

OnePlus uploaded a video demonstrating the camera opening and closing more than 300,000 times (it’s 12 hours long!) and another video that demonstrated it lifting up a rock, so it certainly seems to be able to hold up to abuse.


Though it’s got a 6.67-inch display, the OnePlus 7 Pro is similar in size to the iPhone XS Max, just because there’s no bezels to deal with. The display does curve around the edges of the device, which some may not like, but it looks undeniably good.

OnePlus calls the display a “Fluid AMOLED” display because it has a 90Hz refresh rate, a concept similar to the 120Hz refresh rate on the iPad Pro models. That refresh rate is more noticeable on a smaller device, and scrolling through the OS is super smooth.


Aside from the standout display and the unique pop-up front-facing camera, the OnePlus 7 Pro has some pretty decent specs. There’s a triple-lens camera with telephoto, wide-angle, and ultra wide-angle lenses, an under-display fingerprint sensor, a Snapdragon 855 chip, up to 12GB RAM, up to 256GB storage, a 4,000mAh battery, and a fast charging feature.

On the downside, the OnePlus 7 Pro doesn’t offer wireless charging like many other smartphones on the market, nor does it have an Ingress Protection rating for water resistance. And of course there’s one other major downside for Apple fans — it runs Android.


OnePlus is charging more for this year’s flagship OnePlus smartphone, and the 7 Pro is priced starting at $669. That’s still quite a bit cheaper than the iPhone XS and flagship smartphones from other companies like Samsung, even though it’s using some pretty high-end hardware.

What do you think of the OnePlus 7 Pro and the pop-up selfie cam? Let us know in the comments. We’ll be taking a closer look at the OnePlus 7 Pro and comparing it to the iPhone XS Max in a future video, so keep an eye out for that.

This article, “Hands-On With the OnePlus 7 Pro’s New Pop-Up Camera and Bezel-Free Display” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Many Warner Bros Movies Have Reverted to HD Instead of 4K on iTunes and in User Movie Libraries [Update]

Over the course of the last week or so, multiple Warner Bros movies that were previously available in 4K have reverted to HD, a change that applies to new purchases from iTunes as well as previously purchased movies.

There are complaints about the c…

iPhone XS Max Signal Strength Compared to OnePlus 7 Pro and Samsung Galaxy S10

The Samsung Galaxy S10 and the new OnePlus 7 Pro are both flagship smartphones that are designed to compete with the iPhone XS Max, and to see how their LTE chips compare, PCMag teamed up with Cellular Insights to test the signal strength of the new de…

New 'ZombieLoad' Vulnerability Affects Intel Chips Dating Back to 2011, Apple Released Patch in macOS 10.14.5 [Updated]

Security researchers have discovered a new set of vulnerabilities that affect Intel chips dating back to 2011, including the chips that have been used in Apple devices.

As outlined by TechCrunch, “ZombieLoad,” as it’s being called, consists of four bugs that can allow hackers to exploit the design flaws in the chips to steal sensitive information directly from the processor.


These vulnerabilities are as serious as the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities that were discovered in early 2018 and take advantage of the same speculative execution process, which is designed to speed up data processing and performance.

A white paper shared by notable security researchers (including some who worked on Spectre and Meltdown) offers details on how ZombieLoad functions. [PDF]

While programs normally only see their own data, a malicious program can exploit the fill buffers to get hold of secrets currently processed by other running programs. These secrets can be user-level secrets, such as browser history, website content, user keys, and passwords, or system-level secrets, such as disk encryption keys.

The attack does not only work on personal computers but can also be exploited in the cloud.

ZombieLoad impacts almost every Intel computer dating back to 2011, but AMD and ARM chips are not affected. A demonstration of ZombieLoad was shared on YouTube, displaying how it works to see what you’re doing on your computer. While spying on web browsing is demoed, it can also be used for other purposes like stealing passwords.

There have been no reports of hackers taking advantage of the ZombieLoad vulnerabilities at this time, and Intel has released microcode for vulnerable processors. Apple addressed the vulnerability in the macOS Mojave 10.14.5 update that was released yesterday and in security patches for older versions of macOS that were also released yesterday.

Apple has released security updates in macOS Mojave 10.14.5 to protect against speculative execution vulnerabilities in Intel CPUs.

The issues addressed by these security updates do not affect Apple iOS devices or Apple Watch.

Apple previously released security updates to defend against Spectre—a series of speculative execution vulnerabilities affecting devices with ARM-based and Intel CPUs. Intel has disclosed additional Spectre vulnerabilities, called Microarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS), that apply to desktop and notebook computers with Intel CPUs, including all modern Mac computers.

An Apple support document on the ZombieLoad vulnerability provides details for “full mitigation” protection that can be enabled for customers with computers at heightened risk or that run untrusted software on their Macs.

Full mitigation requires using the Terminal app to enable additional CPU instructions and disable hyper-threading processing technology, which is available for macOS Mojave, High Sierra, and Sierra, but not on certain older machines. Apple says full mitigation could reduce performance by up to 40 percent, so most users will not want to enable it.

According to Intel, its microcode updates will have an impact on processor performance, but for the patch that Apple released in macOS Mojave 10.14.5, there was no measurable performance impact. Apple’s fix prevents the exploitation of ZombieLoad vulnerabilities via JavaScript in Safari.

An Intel spokesperson told TechCrunch that most patched consumer devices could take a 3 percent performance hit at worst, and as much as 9 percent in a datacenter environment. But, the spokesperson said, it was unlikely to be noticeable in most scenarios.

As mentioned above, customers who enable Apple’s full mitigation option will indeed see processor slowdowns because of the need to disable hyper-threading.

One of the researchers who discovered ZombieLoad, Daniel Gruss, told TechCrunch that ZombieLoad is easier to exploit than Spectre, but more difficult than Meltdown, and that it requires a specific set of skills, which means the average person doesn’t need to worry.

Update: This article previously said that Apple would release a patch, but it has been updated to clarify that Apple addressed the issue in security updates made available to Mac owners yesterday. Customers running Mojave should update to macOS 10.14.5, while customers running older versions of macOS should install any available security updates.

This article, “New ‘ZombieLoad’ Vulnerability Affects Intel Chips Dating Back to 2011, Apple Released Patch in macOS 10.14.5 [Updated]” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Lowers Maximum iPhone Trade-In Values, Best Deals Now Limited to Trade-Ins with Purchase

Apple recently lowered direct trade-in values for iPhones, providing customers with a maximum of $349 when trading in an iPhone without purchasing a new one at the same time.

Apple used to offer a maximum of $500 when doing a direct iPhone t…

Adobe Warns Customers of Potential Legal Action for Using Older Versions of Creative Cloud Apps

Last week, Adobe announced that older versions of Creative Cloud apps such as Photoshop and Lightroom would no longer be available to its subscribers, and today, Adobe started sending out warning emails encouraging customers to update or potentially risk legal action.

Adobe today started sending out warning emails to customers who are using older versions of Creative Cloud apps, letting them know those older versions are no longer licensed.


“Please be aware that should you continue to use the discontinued version(s), you may be at risk of potential claims of infringement by third parties,” warns the email.

Adobe goes on to suggest that customers upgrade to the latest versions of the Creative Cloud apps using the Creative Cloud Desktop application.

I just got an email from @Adobe that I’m no longer allowed to use the software that I’m paying for. Time to cancel my subscription I guess.

Share plz. pic.twitter.com/ZIIdqK5AkM

— Matt Roszak 🍞 (@KupoGames) May 10, 2019

Adobe last week said that going forward, Creative Cloud members will only have direct download access to the two most recent major versions of Creative Cloud desktop applications rather than multiple earlier versions.

Focusing our efforts on the latest two major releases of Creative Cloud applications, which the vast majority of Adobe customers are already using, will further enable us to develop the features and functionality most requested by customers and ensure peak performance and benefits across Windows and Mac operating systems. Business customers in need of an older version of a Creative Cloud application should contact their IT Administrator to see if one is available.

In a statement to AppleInsider, Adobe said that it could not comment on the third-party infringement issue because it “concerns ongoing litigation.”

Adobe recently discontinued certain older versions of Creative Cloud applications. Customers using those versions have been notified that they are no longer licensed to use them and were provided guidance on how to upgrade to the latest authorized versions.

Unfortunately, customers who continue to use or deploy older, unauthorized versions of Creative Cloud may face potential claims of infringement by third parties. We cannot comment on claims of third-party infringement, as it concerns ongoing litigation.

Adobe is in the midst of a lawsuit with Dolby and has accused Adobe of copyright infringement and breach of contract, which could be the reason why past versions of Creative Cloud apps are now restricted.

Each of the emails that are going out to customers are customized and will list the older versions of the apps that are still in use. Most users are likely to be unaffected by the change, but some who preferred to use older versions will likely need to update.

Tag: Adobe

This article, “Adobe Warns Customers of Potential Legal Action for Using Older Versions of Creative Cloud Apps” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Announces Support for NFC Tags That Trigger Apple Pay

At the TRANSACT Conference in Las Vegas back in early May, Apple VP of Apple Pay Jennifer Bailey detailed some new Apple Pay features that Apple will be rolling out in the future.

As noted by Scott Harkey and Steve Moser on Twitter, Bailey outlined …

Lenovo Debuts Foldable PC Prototype

Lenovo today unveiled a new foldable ThinkPad, marking the first foldable PC that we’ve seen. The new foldable PC made its debut at the Lenovo Transform event at the Accelerate conference in Florida.

Lenovo’s new device is in the ThinkPad X1 family,…

Powerbeats Pro vs. Powerbeats 3

Powerbeats Pro launched last week, and the first orders are now in the hands of customers. We already did a Powerbeats Pro vs. AirPods hands-on comparison, but we got requests for a video detailing how the new Powerbeats Pro compare to the previous-gen…

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