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Eric Slivka

Apple Stores Quietly Carrying New LG 23.7-Inch UltraFine Display

Over the past few months, supplies of the LG UltraFine 4K and 5K displays have dried up at Apple’s retail and online stores, leading to speculation on the future of Apple-approved displays beyond a rumored ultra high-end 6K display perhaps coming along…

Proposed Tariffs Could Lead to 14% Increase in U.S. iPhone Prices

While U.S. tariffs on Apple’s chargers and cases are already at 25 percent, the company’s main products like the iPhone have so far escaped the extra taxes. That may soon change, however, as the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has begun the app…

Proposed Tariffs Could Lead to 14% Increase in U.S. iPhone Prices

While U.S. tariffs on Apple’s chargers and cases are already at 25 percent, the company’s main products like the iPhone have so far escaped the extra taxes. That may soon change, however, as the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has begun the app…

iPhone XR Successor Could Replace Coral and Blue Options With Green and Lavender

Apple’s colorful iPhone XR lineup comes in a total of six colors, offering plenty of options for users to choose one that best suits their preferences. This year’s successor to the iPhone XR will similarly be available in six colors, but Mac Otakara s…

Apple Shares More Details on Parental Control App Crackdown

Following an email from Phil Schiller to a MacRumors reader yesterday addressing a report from The New York Times on Apple’s removal of a number of App Store apps focused on screen time monitoring and parental controls, Apple has issued a public statem…

Phil Schiller Lays Out Apple's Case for Cracking Down on Screen Time Monitoring Apps

Earlier today, a report from The New York Times highlighted Apple’s removal of a number of App Store apps that had allowed users to monitor usage of their devices or those used by their children. The report suggests that Apple’s move to pull the apps is related to having rolled out its own Screen Time feature in iOS 12 that competes in some ways with these apps, raising concerns over anticompetitive behavior.

Over the past year, Apple has removed or restricted at least 11 of the 17 most downloaded screen-time and parental-control apps, according to an analysis by The New York Times and Sensor Tower, an app-data firm. Apple has also clamped down on a number of lesser-known apps.

In some cases, Apple forced companies to remove features that allowed parents to control their children’s devices or that blocked children’s access to certain apps and adult content. In other cases, it simply pulled the apps from its App Store.

The report quotes several developers who had their apps removed, including one who says the removal came “out of the blue with no warning.” Apple is facing several complaints related to the moves, with a pair of developers filing with the European Union’s competition office and Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab filing an antitrust complaint in that country.

The New York Times shared a brief statement from an Apple spokeswoman saying that Apple treats “all apps the same,” including ones that compete with Apple’s own features like Screen Time. The spokeswoman stated that the affected apps “could gain too much information from users’ devices.”

After reading the article, MacRumors reader Zachary Robinson emailed Tim Cook to express concern over the situation, and earlier today he received a thorough response from Phil Schiller outlining that Apple’s removal of these apps is due to their use of Mobile Device Management (MDM) technology to monitor everything that happens on the user’s phone.

Schiller notes that MDM technology is intended for enterprise users to install on company-owned devices, giving them easy access to and control over those devices for management purposes. The alternative usage of MDM technology by third-party developers for screen time monitoring or parental controls raises significant privacy and security concerns, however, and Apple has moved to address those issues.

The full email from Schiller, which appears to be authentic based on our examination of the included headers:

Thank you for being a fan of Apple and for your email.

I would like to assure you that the App Store team has acted extremely responsibly in this matter, helping to protect our children from technologies that could be used to violate their privacy and security. After you learn of some of the facts I hope that you agree.

Unfortunately the New York Times article you reference did not share our complete statement, nor explain the risks to children had Apple not acted on their behalf. Apple has long supported providing apps on the App Store, that work like our ScreenTime feature, to help parents manage their children’s access to technology and we will continue to encourage development of these apps. There are many great apps for parents on the App Store, like “Moment – Balance Screen Time” by Moment Health and “Verizon Smart Family” by Verizon Wireless.

However, over the last year we became aware that some parental management apps were using a technology called Mobile Device Management or “MDM” and installing an MDM Profile as a method to limit and control use of these devices. MDM is a technology that gives one party access to and control over many devices, it was meant to be used by a company on it’s own mobile devices as a management tool, where that company has a right to all of the data and use of the devices. The MDM technology is not intended to enable a developer to have access to and control over consumers’ data and devices, but the apps we removed from the store did just that. No one, except you, should have unrestricted access to manage your child’s device, know their location, track their app use, control their mail accounts, web surfing, camera use, network access, and even remotely erase their devices. Further, security research has shown that there is risk that MDM profiles could be used as a technology for hacker attacks by assisting them in installing apps for malicious purposes on users’ devices.

When the App Store team investigated the use of MDM technology by some developers of apps for managing kids devices and learned the risk they create to user privacy and security, we asked these developers to stop using MDM technology in their apps. Protecting user privacy and security is paramount in the Apple ecosystem and we have important App Store guidelines to not allow apps that could pose a threat to consumers privacy and security. We will continue to provide features, like ScreenTime, designed to help parents manage their children’s access to technology and we will work with developers to offer many great apps on the App Store for these uses, using technologies that are safe and private for us and our children.

Thank you,

Phil

Apple’s dedication to privacy and security is well-known, so it’s unsurprising the company took steps to address concerns related to how these apps were monitoring device usage. But for some users who had come to prefer the capabilities of these apps such as cross-platform compatibility with Android devices in their households and more robust app controls, Apple’s Screen Time feature feels like a step backward.

This article, “Phil Schiller Lays Out Apple’s Case for Cracking Down on Screen Time Monitoring Apps” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Tim Cook Profiled in New Biography as 'The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level' [Author AMA Today]

Several years ago, Leander Kahney released a well-received biography of Jony Ive, outlining how the publicity-shy “genius behind Apple’s greatest products” came to play such a prominent role at Apple. Kahney painstakingly researched Ive’s background, interviewing numerous friends and acquaintances from various stages of his life to put together a portrait of Apple’s design guru.

Kahney has now returned with another biography of an Apple executive, and this time he has his sights focused on CEO Tim Cook. Like Ive, Cook is an intensely private person, but Kahney spoke with a number of friends and family members, as well as former coworkers and even a few current Apple executives to learn more about the leader who has had the gargantuan task of following Steve Jobs.

While Apple has had some considerable successes under Cook, some have been critical of the direction the company has taken under his leadership, whether it be product missteps, a perceived lack of innovation, or changes in the company’s focus. Kahney finds little to dislike about Cook’s tenure, however, as is made immediately clear by his book’s title: Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level.

Kahney centers his book around six values he argues “provide the foundation” for Cook’s leadership at Apple: accessibility, education, environment, inclusion and diversity, privacy and security, and supplier responsibility.

After a quick look at Cook’s 2011 elevation to the CEO position and the death of Steve Jobs, the book delves into Cook’s history, starting with his upbringing in Alabama and his time at IBM and Compaq.

The book then looks at his decision to join Apple upon the return of Jobs when the company was still on the brink of bankruptcy, and his operations prowess that saw Apple streamline and outsource its manufacturing, radically improving efficiency and allowing for the scale of growth Apple was to experience.

The bulk of the biography covers Cook’s time as Apple CEO, highlighting his transition into the role and some of the early major product announcements like iPhones, Apple Pay, the Apple Watch, and more. The book’s focus then turns to broader themes like Cook’s emphasis on the environment and sustainability, privacy and the fight with the FBI over creating a backdoor into iOS, and efforts at increasing diversity.

The book wraps up with a look at Apple Park and the company’s work on self-driving car technology, and ultimately asks whether Cook is the best CEO Apple has ever had. Analyst Horace Dediu believes that he is, arguing that Jobs was “always the head of product” and “never really a CEO.” That emphasis was needed when Apple was fighting for survival, but as Apple got back on its feet, Jobs largely turned over the day-to-day operation of the company to Cook, and Cook’s generalist perspective has been what the company needs now that it has matured.

While the book does highlight a few missteps along the way, The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level is overall a glowing portrait of Cook and the job he has done leading Apple. You can agree or disagree with that conclusion, but either way, it’s an interesting look at one of the most important figures in Apple’s history and a story that hasn’t really been told at length until now.

With material drawn from those who knew Cook in his early days, as well as current and former Apple executives like Lisa Jackson, Greg Joswiak, Deirdre O’Brien, and Bruce Sewell, Kahney does a good job of weaving new bits of information into parts of the narrative that are already well known.

If you’re interested in hearing more from Kahney about his book and the process of writing it, we’re going to be holding an “Ask Me Anything” session with him in our forums later today. Stop by our Apple, Inc and Tech Industry forum at 11:00 AM Pacific (2:00 PM Eastern) today, and Kahney will be available to answer your questions.

Penguin Books has also graciously agreed to offer ten copies of Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level as part of a giveaway. To enter to win, use the widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winners and send the prizes. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, following us on Instagram, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page. By request of the publisher, only U.S. residents who are 18 years or older are eligible to enter.

Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level

The contest will run from today (April 9) at 7:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 7:00 a.m. Pacific Time on April 16. The winners will be chosen randomly on April 16 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.

For those interested in purchasing the book, it launches next Tuesday, April 16, but you can pre-order now through Amazon, Apple’s Book Store, and other outlets.

This article, “Tim Cook Profiled in New Biography as ‘The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level’ [Author AMA Today]” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Suppliers 'Gearing Up for Mass Production' of Updated iPad and AirPods

Companies in Apple’s supply chain are reportedly “gearing up for mass production” of updated iPad and AirPods models, according to Taiwanese site DigiTimes.

Flexible PCB firms Flexium Interconnect and Zhen Ding Technology are gearing up for mass production for Apple’s next-generation iPad devices, while Compeq Manufacturing and Unitech PCB supply rigid-flex boards for the forthcoming AirPods, according to industry sources.

The report says that both updates are expected to come at Apple’s March 25 event, although reliable sources have indicated the event will focus on Apple’s upcoming news and video services with no hardware announcements planned.

Minor hardware updates could come silently alongside the event or via press release around the same time, as DigiTimes‘s insights via the supply chain are likely limited to production timing rather than event specifics.

Hints of an updated low-cost iPad have been growing, with new iPad models appearing in a regulatory database back in January. Rumors have suggested the entry-level iPad could see its display grow from 9.7 inches to around 10.2 inches thanks to slimmer bezels, but we’re not expecting to see Face ID and removal of the home button with this update.

As for AirPods, we’ve been hearing about an imminent update for many months now, with Apple’s plans seemingly delayed as the company continues work on its AirPower charging mat. Updated AirPods would include a wireless charging case to work with the AirPower mat, as well as other upgrades including “Hey Siri” support and possibly new health monitoring features, a “grippy” texture, and maybe even a new black color option.

Related Roundups: iPad, AirPods 2

This article, “Apple Suppliers ‘Gearing Up for Mass Production’ of Updated iPad and AirPods” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple's Enterprise Developer Program Also Being Used to Distribute Hacked Apps

Misuse of Apple’s enterprise developer program certificates continues to make news, with a new report from Reuters outlining how software pirates have been using the program to distribute hacked versions of popular apps like Minecraft, Pokemon Go, Spotify, Angry Birds, and more.

Using so-called enterprise developer certificates, these pirate operations are providing modified versions of popular apps to consumers, enabling them to stream music without ads and to circumvent fees and rules in games, depriving Apple and legitimate app makers of revenue.

The software pirates in turn make money by charging some users annual subscription fees for “VIP” versions of their hacked apps that are “more stable than the free versions.”

After being alerted by Reuters to these developer accounts being used to distribute hacked apps, Apple removed a number of them, but more have since sprung up to take their place.

Revelations regarding abuse of Apple’s enterprise developer program surfaced late last month, led by word that Facebook and Google were using the program to distribute market research apps to users that were capable of tracking all of their online activity in exchange for rewards.

Apple briefly revoked enterprise certificates for both companies, which had the side effect of temporarily disabling Facebook’s and Google’s internal apps including custom testing versions of their own public apps as well as private internal apps for corporate use such as transportation and food.

And just yesterday, additional abuse of Apple’s enterprise program came to light in the form of apps featuring adult content and gambling that can not be distributed through the traditional App Store due to Apple’s rules prohibiting or limiting those types of content.

Apple today announced that as of February 27, all developer accounts will require two-factor authentication to be turned on, a move that will help secure these accounts and limit their ability to be traded or sold amongst those seeking to skirt Apple’s rules.

This article, “Apple’s Enterprise Developer Program Also Being Used to Distribute Hacked Apps” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Johny Srouji Reportedly Staying at Apple, Not in the Running for Intel CEO

Following a report last week that Apple’s chipmaking chief Johny Srouji was on Intel’s list of candidates for CEO, The Motley Fool’s Ashraf Eassa says that Srouji has informed his team that he will be staying at Apple.

Eassa, who follows Intel ver…

Apple Extends iPod Touch Trademark to Include Gaming Devices

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this month approved for publication a trademark application from Apple for the term “iPod touch” that would extend protection to cover “Hand-held units for playing electronic games; Handheld game consoles” u…

2019 iPhone's Triple-Lens Rear Camera Design Allegedly Showing in New Renderings

Serial phone leaker Steve Hemmerstoffer has partnered with Indian tech site Digit to release some new renderings claimed to be of the next-generation iPhone, presumably scheduled to launch around September of this year.


The distinguishing feature of the renderings is the rear camera, which is a large, unusual-looking patch housing three lenses in a triangular configuration, a flash, and a microphone.

Given the extremely odd appearance, we’d ordinarily dismiss such renderings out of hand unless additional evidence surfaced, but Hemmerstoffer has a long track record of sourcing information from the supply chains of Apple and other phone manufacturers. He does, however, acknowledge that this is a “freakingly early leak” and plans may change before the phone design is finalized.

At least one of this year’s iPhone models is rumored to include a triple-lens rear camera, although early rumors are split on just what the third lens would be used for.

Some sources have indicated Apple is working on “time-of-flight” depth sensing for higher-quality augmented reality experiences, but reliable analyst Ming-Chi Kuo is skeptical that the technology will make it into Apple’s 2019 iPhones. A more traditional third camera lens could still be used for other purposes, however, such as for improving low-light performance or offering improved optical zoom capabilities.

Phone manufacturers have recently been racing to boost their camera lens counts to three, four, or even five in an arms race to make their devices stand out with unique features. Apple, however, has chosen to be selective in how it competes on rear camera specs, largely focusing on software and chip enhancements to improve photo quality while gradually moving to dual-lens rear cameras in its highest-end models.

Related Roundup: 2019 iPhones
Tag: OnLeaks

This article, “2019 iPhone’s Triple-Lens Rear Camera Design Allegedly Showing in New Renderings” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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AirPlay 2 on Smart TVs: Other Brands Coming, Lock Screen Controls, Siri, and More

Following today’s news that Samsung and Apple have worked together to bring an iTunes Movies & TV app and AirPlay 2 support to 2018 and 2019 Samsung smart TVs, Apple has updated its AirPlay page with additional info on how that feature will be implemen…

Samsung Smart TVs Adding Support for iTunes Video Content and AirPlay 2

Samsung today announced that it has worked with Apple to integrate iTunes movies and TV shows, as well as AirPlay 2 support, into its latest smart TVs. The features will roll out to 2018 models via a firmware update this spring and will be included on …

2018's Biggest Apple Leaks: iPhone XS and XR, iPad Pro, Macs, and More

As 2018 comes to a close, it’s a great opportunity to take a look back at the year that was. Yesterday we shared our review of everything Apple announced during the year, and today we’re taking a look at the rumors and leaks that gave us details on Apple’s plans ahead of those announcements.


This year saw the typical iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch updates, although there were a few wrinkles thrown in with the new iPhone XR size, a redesigned iPad Pro without a Home button, and some changes to the Apple Watch with larger displays and thinner bodies.

The Mac side also saw some interesting rumors and product releases, with major improvements to the MacBook Air and the Mac mini coming alongside minor enhancements for the MacBook Pro, but unfortunately a few of Apple’s Mac lines like the iMac and MacBook didn’t see any updates.

Below we’ve rounded up some of the most interesting and notable leaks and rumors for 2018, organized by product.

2018 in Rumors

iPhone

Following the September 2017 launch of the iPhone X, attention quickly turned to Apple’s 2018 iPhone lineup, and usual suspect Ming-Chi Kuo was quick to outline Apple’s plans for a larger 6.5-inch model and a lower-cost 6.1-inch LCD model, correctly predicting a number of details about the devices including a full-screen design with notch, rough pixel density, and general pricing range for what would become the iPhone XR.


In January, Kuo weighed in with a few more details about the iPhone XR, including its single-lens rear camera, aluminum frame, 3GB of RAM, lack of 3D Touch, and pricing. The claim of no 3D Touch was met with considerable skepticism, but it did in fact turn out to be true, with the iPhone XR offering a scaled-back Haptic Touch feature.

A month later, Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman revealed that the iPhone XS Max would have a resolution of 1242×2688 and that it would be available with dual-SIM capabilities and a new gold color option. Apple itself revealed an unreleased gold version of the iPhone X that was submitted to the FCC in September 2017 and which became public in April 2018.


In early April, we also got word that a launch of (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models was imminent, and this indeed turned out to be true, with Apple offering a new mid-cycle color option to benefit a worthy cause.


Later in the month, Kuo returned to reiterate his claim that the iPhone XR would not support 3D Touch, outlining changes to the display and touch-sensing technology that led to Apple removing the feature.

By early June, we were getting a good idea of what the new iPhones would look like, with increasingly accurate design drawings and renderings surfacing, likely from third-party case manufacturers sourcing leaked information from Apple’s supply chain. And in late June we learned more details about the dual-SIM functionality of the upcoming iPhones, based on one physical SIM and one eSIM.


Early July was the first time we heard the 2018 iPhone lineup could see some vibrant new colors, with Kuo claiming that the iPhone XR would come in colors such as red, blue, orange, gray, and white. And a few weeks later we got our first really good look at the front glass panels for all three 2018 iPhones, clearing showing the slightly thicker bezels on the iPhone XR compared to the iPhone XS and XS Max.


Late July was also when we started hearing more substantial rumors that the iPhone XR might launch a bit later than the rest of the 2018 lineup, and this did turn out to be the case. The iPhone XR reportedly faced some technical challenges such as LED backlight leakage, but the staggered release also gave Apple an opportunity to spread out promotion of its new phones a bit.

Physical dummy units of the new phones also started showing up by late July, giving people an opportunity to see how the new models felt in the hand. We also learned that iOS 12 had optimized apps for landscape mode on the iPhone XS Max.


A major iPhone leak came straight from Apple just a couple weeks ahead of the company’s iPhone media event, when the company uploaded an image of the iPhone XS and XS Max in gold to its live streaming page for the event. The leak confirmed several rumors regarding the device, including its “iPhone XS” name. A week later, multiple sites learned that Apple was likely to use the “iPhone XS Max” name for its largest phone, while Mark Gurman indicated the LCD phone could be named “iPhone XR.”


Apple wasn’t done leaking its own announcements, as just ahead of its September 12 media event, the company prematurely updated the product sitemap on its website to list the new phones. The listings confirmed the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR names and also revealed the color and storage capacity options for each model.

iPad Pro

As with the iPhone, rumors about Apple’s redesigned iPad Pro kicked off in the final quarter of 2017, with Ming-Chi Kuo predicting that the device would include a TrueDepth camera system supporting Face ID. Just a month later, Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman accurately described a number of other details about the iPad Pro, including slimmer bezels, a custom Apple-built GPU, Face ID, and no Home button. Gurman also correctly predicted that the iPad Pro would continue to use an LCD rather than an OLED display and that a new version of the Apple Pencil was in the works.


Following the release of iOS 12 betas starting in June, we began to see more evidence of Face ID support on iPad, with developer Steven Troughton-Smith noting that the AvatarKit framework used to drive the Animoji feature had been adapted to work on iPad.

In late July, we heard from Japanese site Mac Otakara that the updated iPad Pro would not include a headphone jack, following in the footsteps of recent iPhone models. The report also claimed the redesigned iPad Pro would include “diamond cut” edges on the front and back, and while the iPad Pro did indeed sport flatter sides and less rounded edges than on previous iPads, we didn’t quite get the beveled edges of the iPhone SE, for example. The report also claimed the Smart Connector would be moving from the edge of the iPad Pro to the bottom rear, which didn’t make a whole lot of sense at the time.


As the calendar flipped over to August, we saw our first sign of redesigned iPad Pro models direct from Apple, with a new low-resolution battery usage icon in the fifth iOS 12 beta depicting a device with slim bezels and no Home button. Similarly, UI masks found in the same beta indicated the iPad Pro display would likely include rounded corners similar to those found on the iPhone X.

Late August saw our first third-party case leaks for the iPad Pro showing a mysterious cutout on the rear of the device just above the Lightning port, which corresponded with rumors of a relocated Smart Connector. Speculation centered around a portrait orientation Smart Keyboard attachment, but that didn’t seem to make much sense and it really wasn’t until we saw the Smart Keyboard Folio unveiled at Apple’s October event that we really understood how Apple intended for the new Smart Connector location to work.


In early September, Kuo issued a new report claiming the new iPad Pro would come with a USB-C port rather than a Lightning port, and that an 18-watt USB-C power adapter would be included in the box.

Early in October, 9to5Mac reported that the new Apple Pencil would feature AirPods-like proximity pairing, rather than requiring the Apple Pencil be plugged into an iPad for pairing purposes. A few days later, we saw our first claim that the new iPad Pro would be just 5.9mm thick, Apple’s thinnest iPad ever. There was some uncertainty about whether this would be true of both iPad Pro sizes, but they did indeed both end up having the same thickness.


Just ahead of Apple’s October 30 event, Benjamin Geskin shared details on the second-generation Apple Pencil that would ship alongside the new iPad Pro, including aspects such as the simpler design, tap and swipe gestures, and magnetic attachment and charging along the side of the iPad Pro. On the same day, a higher-resolution icon was also discovered in iOS 12 revealing the design of the iPad Pro.

iPad

Shortly before the calendar rolled over to 2018, DigiTimes claimed Apple was working on an updated 9.7-inch iPad that could come in late 2018 at a cheaper price point. The timing and pricing claims were off, but Apple was indeed working on a new iPad. The website followed up in early February with a claim that a refreshed iPad could appear as soon as the following month, and a few weeks later new iPad models received certification with the Eurasian Economic Commission.


Once Apple announced its education-focused event in Chicago for March 27, Mark Gurman confirmed that Apple would be introducing a new iPad and education-focused software at the event. That same day, Ming-Chi Kuo claimed that the new low-cost iPad would also include Apple Pencil support, which turned out to be correct.

Macs

Rumors about a new 13-inch notebook surfaced all the way back in January, with DigiTimes claiming Apple was working on a likely replacement for the MacBook Air that hadn’t been updated since 2015. No other details on the machine were shared at the time, and confusion persisted all the way up until release about whether the machine would be a new MacBook Air, a MacBook, or something else, but it eventually made its debut carrying the MacBook Air name.


In January 2018, Gurman offered a vague rumor claiming that Apple was working on a trio of new Mac models that would include a custom coprocessor like the T1/T2 chips found in the MacBook Pro and iMac Pro. He didn’t specify which models these would be, but the claim did end up being true with the MacBook Air, updated MacBook Pro, and Mac mini all gaining the T2 chip in 2018.

Kuo popped up again in March to claim that Apple was preparing a cheaper MacBook Air for launch in the second quarter of the year. It was the first time we’d heard about the new notebook being an updated MacBook Air, and while the timing was a bit off and it certainly wasn’t cheaper than the previous model, the new machine was definitely in the works. DigiTimes followed up a few days later with its claim that the new MacBook Air would include a Retina display, which was welcome but expected news.

By late April, we started hearing better information on the timing of the new MacBook Air, with DigiTimes claiming it was pushed back to the second half of the year, tempering hopes that it might appear at WWDC in June. Reports in mid-August said we should expect a launch around the end of the third quarter, which would put it at the end of September, and we ended up getting it almost exactly a month later than that.


It wasn’t until the latter part of August that we got our first word of a redesigned Mac mini from Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman. He didn’t have much detail to offer at the time, although he said it would be focused on pro users with storage and processor options that would likely push the price higher.


By early September, we heard from Ming-Chi Kuo that the new MacBook Air would include Touch ID support, although it would not have the full Touch Bar seen on the MacBook Pro.

Apple Watch

Late March was the first time we heard anything substantial about the Apple Watch Series 4, with Ming-Chi Kuo revealing that the new models would include 15 percent larger displays, although at the time it wasn’t clear whether that would come from smaller bezels or a larger body, and it eventually turned out to be a bit of both.


The same late August leak straight from Apple that gave us a look at the iPhone XS and XS Max also revealed the new Apple Watch Series 4, showing off a gold stainless steel body, a new red ring for the Digital Crown, a larger edge-to-edge display, and a new Infograph watch face. Subsequently, it was discovered in the watchOS beta that the larger Series 4 model would carry a 384×480 display, a significant increase from the previous 312×390 resolution.


Apple’s premature update of its website sitemap just ahead of its September 12 event revealed that the casing sizes for the Apple Watch would be increasing by 2mm each, as well as various finish and band options.

Software

Following a number of performance and quality issues with iOS 11, Apple took a step back in 2018, with Axios‘ Ina Fried reporting in January that Apple would be delaying some changes originally intended for iOS 12, including a Home screen refresh, CarPlay enhancements, Mail app improvements, and various photo-related updates. By pushing those features back to iOS 13 in 2019, Apple hoped to put more emphasis on stability and bug fixes for iOS 12 while also improving responsiveness and speed. Mark Gurman quickly followed up on Fried’s report to claim that the feature delay also extended to macOS, although to a lesser degree.

In February, Gurman revealed that iOS 12 would bring Animoji to FaceTime and that the update would bring deeper Siri integration, improved Do Not Disturb options, and a redesigned Stocks app. And just a few days before WWDC, Gurman shared his expectations that the conference would focus on software news like digital health tools in iOS 12, ARKit 2, and more, with hardware news coming separately later in the year.


In late May, we found evidence of recent trademark activity from Apple surrounding several potential macOS names, with the greatest amount of activity surrounding the name “Mojave.” Apple itself was responsible for a major macOS leak just a week later, prematurely publishing a brief Xcode 10 video on its Mac App Store servers. The video revealed dark mode, an Apple News app for Mac, and a desert desktop background supporting the possibility of macOS 10.14 being named Mojave.

Miscellaneous

In what was undoubtedly the most ironic and amusing leak of 2018, an internal Apple memo cautioning employees against leaking information to the media was itself leaked in full. The memo specifically mentioned several previous leaks including the iOS 11 gold master, with Apple noting that the employee responsible for the leak was identified and fired. Apple also highlighted the fact that employee leakers can not only lose their jobs but also be subjected to criminal prosecution. The company said it caught 29 leakers in 2017 among its employees, contractors, and supply chain partners, with 12 of those individuals being arrested.


In early May, we saw our first leak regarding an Apple-designed 18-watt USB-C power adapter to support faster charging of iOS devices. There was confusion as to whether it would ship in the box with this year’s iPhones, and while that did not turn out to be the case, it did ship with the new iPad Pro models with Apple starting to sell it on a standalone basis a few weeks later. We got our first look at an actual prototype version of the adapter in early July.

What’s Next?

2019 should once again be a busy year for Apple and we’ll have more to say on that next week, but at a minimum there are still a number of rumors from 2018 that are carrying over into the new year – everything from the ongoing AirPower and AirPods saga to rumored over-ear headphones, Apple’s promised revamped Mac Pro, and much more.

This article, “2018’s Biggest Apple Leaks: iPhone XS and XR, iPad Pro, Macs, and More” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Releases New 'Color Flood' iPhone XR Ad

Apple today shared a new iPhone XR ad entitled ‘Color Flood’ on its YouTube channel. With Cosmo Sheldrake’s “Come Along” as the soundtrack, the ad features a cast of hundreds dressed in colorful jumpsuits running through an otherwise empty town.

I…

Apple Warns Chinese iPhone Ban Would Force a Settlement With Qualcomm, Result in 'Irreparable Harm' to Apple and Others

In a court filing related to the ongoing dispute with Qualcomm that has resulted in a partial ban on iPhone sales in China, Apple this week warned that upholding the ban would cause “truly irreparable harm” to Apple, other companies, and consumers if A…

Apple Warns Chinese iPhone Ban Would Force a Settlement With Qualcomm, Result in 'Irreparable Harm' to Apple and Others

In a court filing related to the ongoing dispute with Qualcomm that has resulted in a partial ban on iPhone sales in China, Apple this week warned that upholding the ban would cause “truly irreparable harm” to Apple, other companies, and consumers if A…

Algoriddim's djay for iOS Goes Free With Optional Pro Subscription, Updated With New Live Performance Tools and More

Algoriddim’s djay apps for iOS and Mac have long been among Apple’s favorite apps to show off at keynote events and in annual “best of” lists, with slick designs, demo-friendly interfaces, and utility that supports both fun and creativity with music an…

Hands-On With the iPhone XR Clear Case From Apple

It took nearly two months following the on-sale date for the iPhone XR, but Apple’s highly anticipated clear case for the colorful device is now available. We’re not entirely sure what the delay was in launching it, and it’s currently the only first-pa…

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