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Airbnb sued by major US apartment landlord

Here’s a huge one for the ever-growing pile of lawsuits filed by and against Airbnb. Apartment Investment & Management Co. (AIMCO) has sued the rental service for “helping tenants breach their leases,” according to The Wall Street Journal. Denver…

President Trump plans to order a new travel ban next week

President Donald Trump said he will sign an executive order next week that updates his contentious January 27th ban on travelers and refugees from seven majority-Muslim countries. Last week, a federal appeals court ruled to keep a stay on the …

Former employee sues Magic Leap for sex discrimination

Augmented reality startup Magic Leap is being accused of sex discrimination and creating a hostile work environment. Ironically, the company is being sued by Tannen Campbell, who was hired to make the startup’s product more female friendly.

Judge sides with Microsoft in court battle against gag orders

Microsoft’s court battle against the government’s gag orders is likely far from over, and that’s a good thing in this case. The Department of Justice asked the court to shut the lawsuit down, but Seattle District Judge James Robart — the same judge…

Appeals court denies Trump's attempt to revive the travel ban

The San Francisco Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday afternoon to keep the stay on President Donald Trump’s travel ban, which aims to halt people from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States. More than 100 technolog…

LG wins $168 million lawsuit against knockoff headphone makers

Last year LG filed a $200 million lawsuit against companies producing counterfeit versions of its wraparound Tone headsets. Now, the presiding judge has spoken. While the amount the company was awarded wasn’t as high as it asked for, $168 million for…

Court indicts contractor who stole NSA's hacking tools

A federal grand jury has indicted former NSA contractor Harold Thomas Martin for what could be the biggest theft of classified materials in the US. According to Reuters, the indictment alleges that Martin has been stealing from NSA, CIA and ot…

The legal arguments for and against reviving Trump's travel ban

San Francisco’s Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments this afternoon in the State of Washington v. Donald Trump, the lawsuit that led to the suspension of President Donald Trump’s contentious immigration ban. Leading companies in the tech wo…

Your old PC's DVD drive might earn you $10

The PC you had a decade ago might be a clunker in comparison to what you have now, but it might just make you a little extra money. In the wake of a class action settlement with major optical disc drive makers over price fixing, Americans can…

Apple accused of intentionally breaking FaceTime on iOS 6

We don’t normally cover individual lawsuits against corporations because, hey, they make a lot of money, and everyone wants a slice. But the circumstances around this one are sufficiently controversial that we’ve made an exception. A woman from Calif…

John Carmack airs grievances over ZeniMax lawsuit on Facebook

ZeniMax might have only won a small fraction of the $4 billion it wanted to get from its Oculus lawsuit, but John Carmack was still definitely unhappy with the court’s decision. The Oculus CTO has posted on Facebook to publicly disagree “with [ZeniMa…

Lawsuit Alleges Apple Broke FaceTime on iOS 6 to Force iOS 7 Upgrades, Save Money

Christina Grace of California has filed a new class-action lawsuit that alleges Apple broke FaceTime in iOS 6 to force users to upgrade to iOS 7, reports AppleInsider. According to the lawsuit, Apple forced users to upgrade so it could avoid payments on a data deal with Akamai.


The class action found its genesis in internal Apple documents and emails disclosed in the VirnetX patent infringement lawsuit, which eventually ended in Apple paying $302 million after a retrial. Apple used two connection methods when launching FaceTime in 2010: a peer-to-peer method that created a direct connection between two iPhones and a relay method that used data servers from Akamai.

When Apple’s peer-to-peer FaceTime technology was found to infringe on VirnetX’s patents in 2012, Apple began to shift toward Akamai’s servers to handle iPhone-to-iPhone connections. A year later, Apple was paying $50 million in fees to Akamai, according to testimony from the VirnetX trial. The class-action lawsuit, pointing to an internal email titled “Ways to Reduce Relay Usage,” alleges that the growing fees were beginning to bother Apple executives.

Apple eventually solved the problem by creating new peer-to-peer technology that would debut in iOS 7. The class-action lawsuit, however, alleges that Apple created a fake bug that caused a digital certificate to prematurely expire on April 16, 2014, breaking FaceTime on iOS 6. Breaking FaceTime on iOS 6, the lawsuit claims, would allow Apple to save money on users who did not upgrade to iOS 7.

At the time, Apple recognized the bug, publishing a support document saying that users who were having FaceTime connectivity problems after April 16, 2014 could update to the latest software to fix the issue. The same support document eventually removed the date “April 16, 2014,” according to AppleInsider.

The lawsuit later points to an internal Apple email chain in which an engineering manager mentions that they were looking at the Akamai contract for the upcoming year and understood that Apple “did something” to reduce usage of Akamai’s services. Another engineer responded by pointing out iOS 6 leaned a lot on Akamai’s services and that Apple “broke iOS 6” and the only way to fix FaceTime was to upgrade to iOS 7.

Apple’s developer page pegged iOS 7 adoption at 87 percent on April 7, 2014, nearly 10 days before Apple allegedly broke iOS 6. The lawsuit claims that forcing iPhone 4s and 4 users to upgrade to iOS 7 was harmful to them because the software would allegedly crash more and run more slowly.

The lawsuit is seeking undisclosed damages and to prove Apple violated California’s unfair competition law.

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Lawsuit Alleges Apple Broke FaceTime on iOS 6 to Force iOS 7 Upgrades, Save Money

Christina Grace of California has filed a new class-action lawsuit that alleges Apple broke FaceTime in iOS 6 to force users to upgrade to iOS 7, reports AppleInsider. According to the lawsuit, Apple forced users to upgrade so it could avoid payments on a data deal with Akamai.


The class action found its genesis in internal Apple documents and emails disclosed in the VirnetX patent infringement lawsuit, which eventually ended in Apple paying $302 million after a retrial. Apple used two connection methods when launching FaceTime in 2010: a peer-to-peer method that created a direct connection between two iPhones and a relay method that used data servers from Akamai.

When Apple’s peer-to-peer FaceTime technology was found to infringe on VirnetX’s patents in 2012, Apple began to shift toward Akamai’s servers to handle iPhone-to-iPhone connections. A year later, Apple was paying $50 million in fees to Akamai, according to testimony from the VirnetX trial. The class-action lawsuit, pointing to an internal email titled “Ways to Reduce Relay Usage,” alleges that the growing fees were beginning to bother Apple executives.

Apple eventually solved the problem by creating new peer-to-peer technology that would debut in iOS 7. The class-action lawsuit, however, alleges that Apple created a fake bug that caused a digital certificate to prematurely expire on April 16, 2014, breaking FaceTime on iOS 6. Breaking FaceTime on iOS 6, the lawsuit claims, would allow Apple to save money on users who did not upgrade to iOS 7.

At the time, Apple recognized the bug, publishing a support document saying that users who were having FaceTime connectivity problems after April 16, 2014 could update to the latest software to fix the issue. The same support document eventually removed the date “April 16, 2014,” according to AppleInsider.

The lawsuit later points to an internal Apple email chain in which an engineering manager mentions that they were looking at the Akamai contract for the upcoming year and understood that Apple “did something” to reduce usage of Akamai’s services. Another engineer responded by pointing out iOS 6 leaned a lot on Akamai’s services and that Apple “broke iOS 6” and the only way to fix FaceTime was to upgrade to iOS 7.

Apple’s developer page pegged iOS 7 adoption at 87 percent on April 7, 2014, nearly 10 days before Apple allegedly broke iOS 6. The lawsuit claims that forcing iPhone 4s and 4 users to upgrade to iOS 7 was harmful to them because the software would allegedly crash more and run more slowly.

The lawsuit is seeking undisclosed damages and to prove Apple violated California’s unfair competition law.

Discuss this article in our forums

Oculus to pay $500 million after ZeniMax lawsuit ends

ZeniMax is triumphant in its lawsuit against Oculus over alleged technology theft… well, sort of. A Texas jury has determined that Oculus must pay $500 million to ZeniMax over claims that Palmer Luckey didn’t comply with a non-disclosure agreement…

New York sues Charter over slow internet speeds

There’s no question that many American internet providers fall short of expectations, but New York might just hold them accountable for making promises they don’t keep. In the wake of a probe that revealed terrible broadband speeds, the state has sue…

ZeniMax now wants $4 million from Oculus as case goes to jury

VR pioneer Oculus has been on trial for several weeks now, defending itself against claims it stole crucial code from ZeniMax. But the ultimate judgement is now in the hands of a jury. As reported by Polygon, closing arguments have concluded a…

Faraday Future sued over missed payments on $2 million VR video

Faraday Future may have had a new car to show off at CES earlier this month, but everyone’s left Las Vegas and old problems are cropping up. Now, the company is being sued by a video effects company for failure to pay for a virtual fly-through of one…

Qualcomm Calls Apple's Claims 'Baseless' in Response to $1 Billion Lawsuit

Following news yesterday that Apple has filed suit against LTE modem supplier Qualcomm for engaging in anticompetitive licensing practices, the chipmaker hit back on Sunday by calling Apple’s claims “baseless” and accusing it of “encouraging regulatory attacks”.

Apple shared a statement with several news sites on Friday announcing the lawsuit, which argued that Qualcomm used its position as the sole supplier of a key iPhone component to drive up patent licensing fees. This morning Qualcomm responded in a statement on its website in which it claimed that Apple “intentionally mischaracterized our agreements and negotiations”.

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“While we are still in the process of reviewing the complaint in detail, it is quite clear that Apple’s claims are baseless. Apple has intentionally mischaracterized our agreements and negotiations, as well as the enormity and value of the technology we have invented, contributed and shared with all mobile device makers through our licensing program. Apple has been actively encouraging regulatory attacks on Qualcomm’s business in various jurisdictions around the world, as reflected in the recent KFTC decision and FTC complaint, by misrepresenting facts and withholding information. We welcome the opportunity to have these meritless claims heard in court where we will be entitled to full discovery of Apple’s practices and a robust examination of the merits,” said Don Rosenberg, executive vice president and general counsel, Qualcomm Incorporated.

Qualcomm was the sole supplier of LTE modems used in iPhones up until 2016, when Intel also began providing the component with the launch of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. Apple claims Qualcomm forced it to use the LTE chips and pay back a percentage of the selling price of the phone in return for access to its patents.

Apple wants $1 billion in rebate payments, which were withheld by Qualcomm after Apple became involved in an antitrust investigation against the company in South Korea.

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CBS and Paramount settle lawsuit with 'Star Trek' fan film

It’s been a wild ride for the folks behind the Axanar Star Trek fan film, but it’s finally over — the fan production group has settled its lawsuit with CBS and Paramount. The terms of the agreement aren’t completely clear, but both parties have anno…

Samsung can't use in-box warranty to kill Galaxy S4 lawsuit

Oh Samsung. When the company isn’t busy recalling cellphones and washing machines for being safety hazards, it’s busy fighting its customers in court. In 2015, Daniel Norcia contended that he was misled by Samsung about the capabilities of his Galaxy…

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